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Trend in sight

Prospective trends seen at FIAC 2017

Art Market | Although leading international art fairs are mainly market-oriented, they also convey relevant information on creative trends. As far as the art market is concerned, the International Contemporary Art Fair (FIAC) confirms the concentration of historic fundamentals, whether they be already established pieces or pieces that are still unknown.. That being said, a closer examination of the Fair’s wide variety of stands, brings outtwo prospective common themes, forecasting an evolution of contemporary aesthetics around the themes of mutant bodies and utopian habitats.

Tomás Saraceno, Stillness in Motion - 35.02, 2017 © Courtesy de l’artist et de la galerie Esther Schipper
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Tomás Saraceno, Stillness in Motion - 35.02, 2017
© Courtesy de l’artist et de la galerie Esther Schipper

Mutant bodies

Today’s hyper-connected digital era shifts our collective imagination towards the issues of genetic transformation and artificial intelligence. This trend is illustrated at FIAC 2017 through the presence of artists - most of which are already recognised by the market - that question the idea of mutant bodies. For instance, Kamel Mennour’s gallery presents Moonrise East (2005), a monumental sculpture by Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone that belongs to a series of twelve comical and expressive aluminum monsters - which seem to have escaped from a futuristic archeologic site. At the Métro Pictures stand, Camille Henrot’s 2016/2017 sculptures randomly recompose body parts, inspired by Henri Moore’s works.

Thomas Bayrle, Scheibenwischer (Dirigent), 2013 (detail) © Courtesy de l'artiste et de la Galerie Mezzanin
Thomas Bayrle, Scheibenwischer (Dirigent), 2013 (detail)
© Courtesy de l'artiste et de la Galerie Mezzanin
Meanwhile, at the Mezzanin gallery stand, pioneering German Pop Art artist Thomas Bayrle, presents Der Dirigent (2013). The animated sculpture humorously displays a human-like robot -a conductor- that generates vibrations to the rhythm of a musical piece by Eric Satie. The humanoid machine is thus pœticized by being assimilated to a sensitive body. Works addressing the topic of the body’s deformation and transformation can also be found at the Chantal Crousel gallery through Jean-Luc Moulène’s work, at the Espaivisor gallery with Orlan, or at the Praz-Delavalade stand with artist Jim Shaw

Utopian habitats

At the heart of the solutions conjured by our collective imagination when addressing migratory flows, mobile, precarious and survival-orientated habitat is gradually replacing the inclination for attractive, architectural sculptures such as Guggenheim in Bilbao. This tendency is evidenced by the increasing audience for pioneering artist-architect Yona Friedman, whose models are presented at the Jérôme Poggi gallery stand. Through his evolving Utopies reálisables, the artist shifts the purpose of architecture towards human survival, in the context of a world with increasing inequalities.
Esther Schipper’s gallery showcases a research on spider webs by Tomas Saraceno, an artist that often appears in major international biennials. The Argentinian artist explores new ways of sustainably living and feeling one’s environment. His utopian visions are the result of a systemic approach involving art, architecture, natural science, astrophysics and engineering. The artist addresses the key principles of society’s reorganization : cooperation, cohabitation and interdependent networked systems; offering a “galactic” approach to the issue of habitat.

A complete analysis is available upon request.

Nina Rodrigues-Ely
Publié le 25/10/2017
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Version française

Tomás Saraceno, Stillness in Motion - 35.02, 2017 © Courtesy de l'artist et de la galerie Esther Schipper Thomas Bayrle, Scheibenwischer (Dirigent), 2013 (detail) © Courtesy de l'artiste et de la Galerie Mezzanin Larrisa Fassler et Yona Friedman, vue du stand de la Galerie Jérôme Poggi, FIAC 2017 © Nicolas Brasseur / Courtesy Galerie Jérôme Poggi, Paris

Tomás Saraceno, Stillness in Motion - 35.02, 2017
© Courtesy de l’artist et de la galerie Esther Schipper

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