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Trend in sight

Art and anticipation

Contemporary Art | During the second decade of the 21st century, there have been an incalculable number of exhibitions with the theme of the future, crystallizing a profound occupation of the West. A two-part program - in Brussels and Paris - organized around the Jacques Attali essay « A brief history of the future » (2006) sets itself apart in proposing a structuralist vision of the history of humanity.

David LaChapelle, Gas Shell, 2012 © David LaChapelle Studio, Jablonka Maruani Mercier Gallery
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David LaChapelle, Gas Shell, 2012
© David LaChapelle Studio, Jablonka Maruani Mercier Gallery

The two exhibitions at the Belgian Royal Museum of Fine Arts and the Louvre mean to inform a general public and transpose Jacques Attali’s prospective text into visual pedagogy :
At the Louvre, the curators Jean de Loisy et Dominique de Font-Réaulx unravel a thread of the historical epic from antiquity onwards, mixing in contemporary artists (Camille Henrot, Tomas Sarraceno, Ai Weiwei...).
In Brussels, the young curators Jennifer Beauloye and Pierre-Yves Desaive take a contemporary angle, highlighting artistic visions that act like seismographs, confronting metaphoric and anticipatory approaches (David Altmedj, Charles Csuri et James Shaffer, Olga Kisseleva, Petre Fend...).
Beyond his predictions or political previsions, Jacques Attali reminds us that human and ideological history, the flux of influence, are articulated around major technological mutations, in a hegemonic back and forth between European nations and later the United Sates : the rudder (Bruges), the galley (Venice), the printer (Anvers), the bank (Genoa), the caravelle (Amsterdam), the steam engine (London), the combustion engine (Boston), electrical goods (New York), the micro-processor (Los Angeles).

The Brussels exhibition begins in the 80’s, with a chapter devoted to Los Angeles, where the industrialization of silicon marked the starting point of our portable computers and traced the lines of a new nomadism, with new dreams and behaviors. This first technological revolution outlined civilization’s shift towards a globally connected and interdependent world; and this new « hyper connectivity » continues to develop with the rise of nano-technologies and the Internet of Things. To be continued.

Nina Rodrigues-Ely
Publié le 18/11/2015
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David LaChapelle, Gas Shell, 2012 © David LaChapelle Studio, Jablonka Maruani Mercier Gallery Claudio Parmiggiani, L'ascension de la mémoire 1976 © Archives Claudio Parmiggiani,and Meessen de Clercq, Bruxelles Jean-Michel Alberola, L'espérance a un fil, 2006-2009 © Galerie Daniel Templon, Paris Stelarc, Third Ear, 2007 © Nina Sellars Tomás Saraceno , exposition « Hybrid Solitary, Semi Social Quintet, On Cosmic Webs » © Tanya Bonakdar Gallery & Biennale d'architecture de Chicago Chéri Samba, La Destruction du monde par l'homme © Galerie MAGNIN-A, Paris & Chéri Samba Ugo Rondinone , Diary of Clouds 2007-2008 © Galerie Eva Presenhuber & Ugo Rondinone

David LaChapelle, Gas Shell, 2012
© David LaChapelle Studio, Jablonka Maruani Mercier Gallery

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